The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #58 Jim Thome

Blasting onto the last at #58 is Indians slugger Jim Thome. Thome’s career is marked by power, plate discipline, and more power. He joins Barry Bonds and Babe Ruth as the only three players in history with 600 career home runs and 1,700 career walks. He joins Bonds and Ruth as the only three players in history with 600 home runs and a .400 on-base percentage. He joins Bonds and Ruth as the only three players in history with at least 600 home runs, 1,650 walks, and 1,650 RBIs, and he joins Bonds, Ruth, and Ted Williams as the only four players in history with at least 1,740 career walks and at least a .554 slugging %. His 13.8 AB/HR mark is the 4th best in history and his 612 home runs are 8th on the all-time list. 

The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #59 Vladimir Guerrero

Teeing off at #59 on our list is Vladimir Guerrero. Vlad “The Impaler” was every bit as feared as his 15th-century counterpart, terrorizing pitchers with his combination of power, speed, and plate discipline. Vlad’s impact is reflected by the uniqueness of his accomplishments. He’s the only player to debut since 1960 with at least a .318 career batting average and a .553 career slugging percentage. He’s the only player to debut since 1960 with a career batting average of at least .318 and a career OPS+ of 140. He’s the only player since 1950 with at least 400 career home runs and fewer than 1,000 strikeouts. He’s the only player since 1950 with at least 400 career home runs and a .318 batting average. He’s the only player since 1950 with at least 970 career extra-base hits, an OPS+ of 140, and fewer than 1,000 strikeouts. He’s the only player in history with a career .318 batting average, 400 home runs, and 180 stolen bases and he’s also the only player in history with at least 200 hits, a .330 batting average, 40 stolen bases, and 39 home runs in a single season. Vlad is 7th all-time in intentional walks, leading the league five times which is tied for the 4th most in history. He was named the 2004 NL MVP and finished third in 2005 and 2007.

The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #60 Mike Piazza

Backstopping the list at #60 is Dodgers and Mets legend Mike Piazza.  Piazza is, without question, the greatest offensive catcher of all time. Among catchers, he’s #1 all-time in home runs, offensive WAR, slugging %, and OPS+ (min. 500 games). He has the highest batting average since 1937 among catchers (min .500 games). His 185 OPS+ in 1997 is the most ever by a catcher (min. 500 plate appearances) and he has two of the top-3 single-season OPS+ marks ever for a catcher (min. 500 plate appearances). He has the most 30-home run seasons, most 90-RBI seasons, and most 80-run seasons by a catcher. Proving Piazza’s numbers weren’t just elite for a catcher, he is one of only eight players at any position with at least a career .308 batting average, 143 OPS+, and 400 home runs.  Piazza finished in the top-10 in MVP voting seven times including two runner-ups and a third-place finish.

The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #61 Tom Glavine

Working the margins at #61 is Braves lefty workhorse Tom Glavine. Glavine won two NL Cy Young awards while also finishing second twice and third twice. He led the league in wins five times which is the most by any pitcher since 1957. He’s one of only four pitchers since 1926 with at least 300 career wins and fewer than 205 career losses. Glavine finished in the top-10 in innings 12 times, wins and shutouts 11 times, and winning % 10 times. Glavine’s regular-season success carried over into the postseason where he is second all-time in postseason innings and third all-time in wins while also winning the World Series MVP for the Braves in 1995.

The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #62 Gaylord Perry

Sailing in at #62 is Gaylord Perry. Only Nolan Ryan and Phil Niekro have pitched more career innings since the dead-ball era than the appropriately nicknamed Ancient Mariner. Perry was the oldest player in the league for three consecutive seasons, pitching until he was 44 years old. He won the AL Cy Young in 1972 and the NL Cy Young in 1978 at the age of 40.  Perry led the league in wins three times and had five 20-win seasons. While Perry’s elite seasons are notable, it’s the number of good seasons that define his legacy. He finished in the top-10 in strikeouts and complete games 12 times, WAR, ERA, and innings 11 times, WHIP 10 times and wins nine times.

The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #63 John Smoltz

Joining the list at #63 is Braves ace and closer John Smoltz. Smoltz truly was the most versatile pitcher in Major League Baseball history. He’s the only pitcher in history with 200 career wins and 150 career saves and the only pitcher in history with a 24-win season and a 55save season. Smoltz won the Cy Young in 1996 when he became one of only three pitchers in history to compile a season with 24 wins, 250 innings, 275 strikeouts, and a K/9 of at least 9.8. Smoltz was even better in the postseason, throwing 209 innings with a stellar 2.67 ERA and 1.14 WHIP both of which represented improvements over his spectacular regular season marks. Smoltz is third all-time in postseason innings, second in postseason wins, and his 15-4 record is the highest winning % ever among pitchers with at least 135 postseason innings.

The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #64 Roy Halladay

Painting the corner at #64 is Roy “Doc” Halladay. Halladay was the premier pitcher in baseball from 2002-2011, racking up three 20-win seasons and two 19-win seasons on his way to two AL Cy Young awards, two second-place finishes, and seven top-5 finishes. Halladay led the league in WAR for pitchers four times and finished in the top-4 eight times. Combining durability with precision, Halladay led the league in innings four times which is 7th all-time and strikeout-to-walk ratio five times which is 6th all-time. He also led the league in complete games seven times which is the second-most in history and shutouts four times which is the 6th most in history. Halladay is one of only four pitchers in the live-ball era with at least a .659 winning % and 2,000 career strikeouts.

The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #65 Cal Ripken Jr.

Streaking in at #65 is “Iron Man” Cal Ripken Jr. Ripken holds the all-time record for most consecutive games played at an unbelievable 2,632 which are 502 more than any other player and over 2,000 games ahead of any active player. When Ripken retired in 2001, he was the all-time leader in doubles among shortstops and 2nd all-time in home runs, RBIs, and hits. His 19 all-star game selections are four more than any other shortstop. Ripken is the only shortstop in history with 75 Offensive WAR and 35 defensive WAR and he is one of only two shortstops in MLB history to lead the league in WAR three times. Ripken joins Willie Mays and Mike Trout as the only two players in history to win two regular-season MVPs and two all-star game MVPs.

The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #66 Nolan Ryan

Firing in at #66 is Nolan Ryan. The Ryan Express is the most prolific strikeout pitcher in the history of baseball. His 5,714 career strikeouts are 839 more than any other pitcher in history which is a record that ranks right at the top on the list of the most unbreakable records in sports. Ryan led the league in K/9 and H/9 innings an unbelievable 12 times each. Perhaps more remarkable, he finished in the top-5 in K/9 innings 20 times and H/9 17 times. His seven career no-hitters are three more than any other player in MLB history. He has the most shutouts of any pitcher to debut since 1942 and his 383 strikeouts in 1973 are the most in a single season in history. Ryan is tied with Randy Johnson for most 300-strikeout seasons with six and he joins Johnson as the only pitchers in history to lead the league in strikeouts four consecutive years on two different occasions.  

The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #67 Gary Sheffield

Joining the list at #67 is Gary Sheffield. Sheff is one of the great power-speed combos professional baseball has ever seen. He’s the only player in history with 500 home runs, 250 stolen bases, 1,450 walks, and fewer than 1,200 strikeouts. He’s the only player since the dead-ball era to have 1,000 extra-base hits, 250 stolen bases, and fewer than 1,200 strikeouts. He’s one of only four players in history with at least 500 home runs, 250 stolen bases, and a 70% stolen base percentage. He finished in the top-10 in MVP voting six times including three finishes in the top-3. Sheff finished in the top-10 in on-base % 10 times, helping him become one of only seven players in history with at least a .392 on-base percentage and 500 career home runs. Sheff led the Marlins to the 1997 World Series title, reaching base 15 times in a 7-game thriller over the Indians.

The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #68 Whitey Ford

Coming in at #68 is Yankees ace Whitey Ford. Ford’s .690 winning percentage is the second-highest in the modern era among pitchers with at least 1,500 career innings. He’s the only pitcher in Major League Baseball history to have at least a .690 winning percentage while throwing at least 3,000 innings, and he’s the only pitcher in history with at least 230 career wins with fewer than 110 losses. Ford won the 1961 Cy Young when he pitched one of only four seasons in MLB history with at least 25 wins with fewer than five losses. While Ford was a stellar regular season pitcher, it was his work in the World Series that defines his legacy. Ford is the only pitcher in history with six World Series rings and a World Series MVP. He holds the record for most career wins in the World Series with 10, three more than any other pitcher. He also holds the World Series records for games started, innings, and strikeouts. His 33 2/3 consecutive scoreless innings in the World Series are the most in history for a starting pitcher, and he’s the only pitcher in history to throw at least 14 innings without allowing a run in two different World Series.

The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #69 Eddie Mathews

Swinging in at #69 is Braves slugger Eddie Mathews. When Mathews retired in 1968, he was without question the greatest third baseman in Major League Baseball history, ranking first in home runs, runs, RBIs, slugging % and OPS+ (among third basemen who played a min. of 10 seasons). Mathews still ranks second all-time among third basemen in both home runs and WAR and is in the top five in RBIs, walks, and OPS+. Mathews twice finished runner-up in National League MVP voting and is the only third baseman to finish in the top-6 in offensive WAR for 11 consecutive seasons. He also led the league in walks four times, home runs twice, and is the only third baseman in history to hit at least 46 home runs twice. Mathews teamed with Hank Aaron to power the Braves to the 1957 World Series title, reaching base 13 times in a thrilling seven-game series with the Yankees.

The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #70 Johan Santana

At #70 on our list is Minnesota Twins ace Johan Santana. Over 12 seasons, Santana posted a lofty .641 winning percentage, which is the 10th best mark of all pitchers with a min. of 10 seasons since 1960. Among pitchers who played at least 10 seasons, his 136 ERA+ is the 5th highest in the last 100 years. Santana is the only player in MLB history to lead the league in ERA+, WHIP, H/9, strikeouts, and SO/9 in three consecutive seasons. He is one of only four pitchers to lead the league in WHIP for four consecutive seasons (Carl Hubbell, Sandy Koufax, and Clayton Kershaw). Since 1920, he is the only pitcher to lead the league in wins, ERA, strikeouts, innings, games started, ERA+, WHIP, H/9, and SO/9 in the same season. He is one of only seven players to lead the league in ERA+ for three consecutive seasons (Christy Mathewson, Lefty Grove, Roger Clemens, Greg Maddux, Randy Johnson, and Clayton Kershaw). Since 1920, he is one of only four pitchers to lead the league in H/9 for three consecutive seasons (Bob Feller, Sandy Koufax, and Nolan Ryan). Santana won the Cy Young in 2004 and in 2006 and should’ve won a third in 2005 when he was easily the best pitcher in the American League.

The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #71 Wade Boggs

Hitting the list at #71 is Boston on-base machine Wade Boggs. Boggs was one of the most feared hitters in baseball in the 1980s, leading the league in times on base for eight consecutive seasons and intentional walks for six consecutive seasons. His .328 career batting average is the 2nd highest of anyone debuting since 1941 and his .415 career on-base % is the 7th best of anyone debuting since 1951. He joins Ty Cobb, Tris Speaker, and Stan Musial as the only players in Major League Baseball history with 3,000 hits, a .415 on-base %, and 575 doubles. Boggs joins Ty Cobb, Rogers Hornsby, Ted Williams, and Stan Musial as the only players in history to lead the league in on-base percentage six times and batting average five times. Cementing his status as one of the most difficult outs the league has ever seen, Boggs is one of only four players in history to have more than 1,400 walks with fewer than 750 strikeouts.

The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #72 Al Kaline

Entering the list at #72 is Mr. Tiger Al Kaline. Kaline patrolled right field in Detroit for 22 years, garnering 18 all-star selections and 10 Gold Gloves. He’s one of only 11 players in Major League Baseball history with at least 1,600 runs, 1,500 RBIs, and 3,000 hits. Kaline finished among the top-10 in MVP voting nine times, including two runner-up finishes in 1955 and 1963. While Kaline had his fair share of leading the league it was the number of times he spent among the league leaders that defines his career. He finished in the top-5 in WAR for position players eight times, batting average and on-base % seven times, and slugging % and adjusted ops+ five times. Kaline’s lasting legacy for Detroit was helping bring home the 1968 World Series title after hitting .379 with eight RBIs in a thrilling 7-game series against Bob Gibson and the Cardinals.  

The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #73 Roberto Clemente

Joining the list at #73 is Pirates legend Roberto Clemente. Clemente was a 4-time batting champion in the National League and finished in the top-5 in batting average an astonishing 10 times. He won the National League MVP in 1966 and finished in the top-10 eight times. Clemente reached 3,000 career hits in the final at-bat of the 1972 season which would sadly end up being the last at-bat of his career as he died in a plane crash while on a humanitarian trip in the offseason. While Clemente’s superior bat-to-ball skills produced 13 seasons with a batting average over .300, it was also his defense that puts him on the shortlist of greatest right fielders in history. His 12.2 defensive WAR is the most all-time for a right fielder. He’s second all-time among right fielders in assists and putouts and is the all-time leader in total zone runs as a right fielder. Clemente helped lead the Pirates to two World Series Championships including in 1971 when he was named World Series MVP, making him one of only four players in history to reach 3,000 hits and win a World Series MVP.

The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #74 Harmen Killebrew

Powering into the list at #74 is Twins slugger Harmon Killebrew. Known as “the Killer” for his tape-measure shots, Killebrew led the league in home runs six times which is the fourth most in history. He also finished in the top-5 in home runs an incredible 12 times and slugging % and OPS+ ten times. He was named the American League MVP in 1969 and finished in the top-4 in MVP voting six times. Killebrew’s 14.2 at-bats per home run ratio is 7th best in history and he has the 12th highest home run and 15th highest walk totals of all time. Killebrew was also versatile with the glove, playing more than 450 games at three different positions and making the all-star game at all of them.

The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #75 Ernie Banks

Coming in at #75 is Mr. Cub Ernie Banks. Banks obliterated conventional wisdom by proving it was possible for a shortstop to be an offensive force. By the time he finished his career in 1971, his 512 career home runs were more than double the total of any other shortstop in history, paving the way for future power-hitting shortstops like Cal Ripken Jr., and Alex Rodriguez. Banks became the first shortstop in the modern era to lead the National League in home runs and lead the league in home runs twice. He was named NL MVP in 1958 and 1959 becoming the first shortstop to win multiple MVPs.

The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #76 Carl Hubbell

At #76 on our list is New York Giants ace Carl Hubbell. When it came to baserunners, nobody was stingier than King Carl. He led the league in WHIP six times which is the most in MLB history (Cy Young predated MLB). Hubbell’s four consecutive seasons leading the league in WHIP are tied for the most all-time, and he’s the only player in MLB history to lead the league in WHIP six times over an eight-year span. Hubbell won the National League MVP in 1933 and 1936, becoming one of only three pitchers to win two MVP awards.  Hubbell led the league in K/BB ratio five times, and wins and ERA three times. He was at his best in the 1933 World Series when he pitched a shutout in game 1 and came back to throw an 11-inning shutout in game 4, becoming only the second pitcher in history to throw at least 20 innings in a single World Series without allowing a run.

The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #77 Hal Newhouser

Joining the list at #77 is Tigers legend and Detroit native Hal Newhouser. Prince Hal’s career is most notable for his incredible run from 1944-1948 in which he joined Lefty Grove as the only two pitchers since the dead-ball era with three consecutive 25-win seasons. In 1944 and 1945, Newhouser became the only pitcher in history to win back-to-back league MVP awards and he nearly won a third in 1946 finishing runner-up to Ted Williams. Newhouser is the only pitcher since the dead-ball era to have back-to-back seasons of at least 25 wins and an ERA under two. He’s also the only pitcher in history with three consecutive seasons of at least 25 wins and fewer than 10 losses. Newhouser helped lead the Tigers to the 1945 World Series championship, pitching a complete game to go along with 10 strikeouts against the Cubs in a victorious game 7.

The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #78 Mark McGwire

Thundering in at #78 is A’s and Cardinals slugger Mark McGwire. Depending on what statistics we focus on, we can say Big Mac is—without hyperbole—the most prolific home run hitter in baseball history. McGwire’s at-bat per home run ratio of 10.6 is by far the best of all time. He owns the records for most home runs over a two-year, three-year, and four-year period. He is the only player in history with a 70 and a 60-home run season. He’s tied with Babe Ruth and Sammy Sosa for most 50-home run seasons. McGwire and Sosa are the only players in history with four consecutive 50-home run seasons. McGwire joins Ruth as the only two players with five seasons of at least 49 home runs. McGwire is 7th all-time in slugging percentage and his .588 mark is the second-best since 1960. His adjusted OPS+ of 163 is 11th all-time and 4th since 1960. McGwire led the league in home runs, slugging %, and OPS+ four times and walks and on-base percentage twice each. His 162-walk total in 1998 is the 5th highest single-season mark in history.  Big Mac finished among the top-7 in MVP voting five times, including a runner-up finish in 1998 after breaking Roger Maris’s single-season home run record.

The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #79 Willie McCovey

Coming in at #79 on our list is Giants slugger Willie McCovey. To get an idea of how feared McCovey’s bat was, consider that he was intentionally walked 260 times in his career which is the 5th highest total in history behind only Barry Bonds, Albert Pujols, Stan Musial, and Hank Aaron. That’s some stellar company. Before Bonds rewrote the history books on intentional walks from 2002-2004, McCovey held the single-season intentional walks record (45). In fact, McCovey still has the highest non-Bonds single-season mark and he’s the only non-Bonds player to reach 40+ intentional walks in a season twice. McCovey led the National League in slugging % and OPS+ for three consecutive seasons. He led the league in home runs three times and finished in the top-5 seven times. He took home the National League MVP in 1969 and was 8th on the all time home run list when he retired in 1980. 

The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #80 Tony Gwynn

Hitting the list at #80 is Padres legend Tony Gwynn. Gwynn is arguably the most skilled batsman in baseball history, using his keen eye and amazing contact skills to reach 3,000 hits in just 2,284 games which is the 3rd fastest to 3,000 in history and the fastest in more than 100 years. Gwynn led the league in batting average eight times and hits seven times, both ranking second in history behind Ty Cobb. He also led the league in at-bats/K a remarkable 10 times. His .338 career batting average is the highest since 1960 and the 18th best mark in history. Gwynn is one of only four players to hit at least .350 in four consecutive seasons and the only to do so since 1930. He’s one of only three players in history with at least 3,100 career hits, 300 stolen bases, and fewer than 450 strikeouts and the only player to do it since 1930. Gwynn hit over .300 in an incredible 19-straight seasons and hit .394 in 1994 which is the best single-season mark since 1941.

The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #81 Rod Carew

At #81 on our countdown is 18-time all-star and Twins legend Rod Carew. Carew led the league in batting average seven times which is the 4th most in history behind only Honus Wagner, Ty Cobb, and Tony Gwynn. Carew joins Rogers Hornsby and Stan Musial as the only three players ever to lead the league in runs, hits, triples, batting average, on-base percentage, OPS, and OPS+ in the same season. He is the only player in history to have at least 235 hits, 125 runs, 35 doubles, 15 triples, 20 stolen bases, 65 walks, an OPS+ of 175, and a batting average of .388 in a single season. He was the 1977 American League MVP and finished in the top-10 six times. Carew has the 3rd highest career batting average since 1960, trailing only Tony Gwynn and Wade Boggs.

The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #82 Sammy Sosa

Next up at #82 is Sammy Sosa. Slammin’ Sammy’s 10-year stretch with the Cubs from 1995 to 2004 produced the greatest home run barrage Major League Baseball has ever seen, literally. Sosa’s 479 home runs over that period are the most ever over 10 years. In fact, Sosa also holds the records for most home runs over a 5-year, 6-year, 7-year, 8-year, and 9-year stretch. Sosa is the only player in history with three seasons of 60+ home runs. He also shares the record for the most 50-home run seasons with four. He’s the only player in history with more than 60 home runs and 140 runs in a single season. He’s the only player to have more than 65 home runs, 150 RBIs, and 130 runs in a single season. He’s the only player in history with a season of at least 64 home runs and 155 RBIs and he did it twice. Sosa, Alex Rodriguez, and Rafael Palmeiro are the only three players in history with nine consecutive seasons of 35 home runs and 100 RBIs. He was the NL MVP in 1998 and the runner-up in 2001. Remarkably, Sosa led the league in home runs twice, but not in any of his 60-home run seasons.

The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #83 Bob Feller

Rifling in at #83 is Cleveland great Bob Feller. Like many of the elite players of the 1940s, Bullet Bob’s career was interrupted by service in WWII. Feller missed three-and-a-half seasons just as he was establishing himself as the best pitcher in the world. It’s not hard to imagine Feller leading the league in wins for what would’ve been an unbreakable record of nine consecutive seasons had he been stateside for his entire career. In fact, he’d likely hold the records for most consecutive seasons leading the league in strikeouts and innings as well. Despite his lengthy absence from the majors, Feller put together one of the most impressive pitching careers MLB baseball has ever seen. He was the best pitcher in the American League the three years before left for the war and arguably in his first two full seasons after returning from the war. Feller is one of only 10 pitchers to throw at least 3,800 innings with an ERA+ of at least 122. He also led the league in strikeouts seven times, wins six times and innings pitched and games started five times each.

The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #84 Robin Roberts

Popping in at #84 on our list is Phillies great Robin Roberts. No pitcher in MLB history had a six-season run quite like the one Roberts went on from 1950-1955. During this stretch, Roberts became the only pitcher ever to lead the league in games started for six consecutive seasons. He also became the first pitcher in history to have separate streaks of leading the league in wins four consecutive seasons and innings pitched five consecutive seasons. Roberts was the best pitcher in baseball in 1952 and 1955, finishing highest among pitchers in NL MVP voting, and he was the second-best pitcher in 1953 and 1954. He is the only pitcher in MLB history to lead the league in wins, innings, games started, and complete games for four consecutive seasons. Roberts is the only pitcher since the dead-ball era with a season of at least 28 wins and a BB/9 of 1.3 or less.  Roberts also led the league in WAR for Pitchers and strikeout-to-walk ratio five times and BB/9 four times. 

The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #85 Ferguson Jenkins

Landing at #85 on our list is Ferguson Jenkins. Fergie used his pinpoint control and tireless arm to become one of only six pitchers in MLB history (and only the second in the last 100 years) to throw 4,500 career innings with a WHIP less than 1.15 and a BB/9 of two or less. Fergie led the league in wins twice and finished in the top-3 seven times. He led the league in strikeout-to-walk ratio and BB/9 five times, complete games four times, and finished in the top-10 in WHIP an astounding 13 times.  He won the 1971 NL Cy Young Award and nearly won it four more times finishing 2nd in 1967 and 1974 and 3rd in 1970 and 1972. Jenkins is the only player in MLB history to have at least 24 wins and a strikeout-to-walk ratio of at least 7.0 in the same season. He’s the only player in the last 100 years with at least 265 career complete games and a WHIP under 1.15. He’s the only player in the last 100 years with a season of at least 30 complete games and a BB/9 of 1.0 or less. He’s one of only three players in the last 100 years to lead the American League and the National League in wins. He’s the only player in the last 80 years with a season of 25 wins and a BB/9 of 1.2 or less, and he’s one of only four players in the last 100 years to win at least 115 games in both leagues.

The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #86 Hank Greenberg

At #86 on the list is The Hebrew Hammer Hank Greenberg. Like his fellow masher Johnny Mize, Greenberg missed a huge chunk of his peak serving in WWII. For Greenberg the cost was even more substantial as he would miss 4.5 seasons, limiting his career to just 1,394 career games, or the equivalent of 8.5 seasons worth of games. All Greenberg did during his short time in the league was put together one of the most extraordinary stretches in MLB history. Greenberg led the league in HRs, RBIs, and extra-base hits four times, total bases and walks twice, and slugging %, OPS, and runs one time each. He’s 6th all-time in slugging %. His 184 RBIs in 1937 are the 3rd highest single-season total in history and his 63 doubles in 1934 are the fourth most in history. He won the American League MVP in 1935 and 1940 and finished third in 1937 and 1938. Greenberg is one of only five players in history with three seasons of at least 150 RBIs. He’s the only player in history with a 50 home run season and a 60 double season. He’s also the only player in history with a 180 RBI season and a season of at least 58 home runs. It’s wild to think what Greenberg’s career would’ve looked like with the 2,200 at-bats he lost to the war.

The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #87 Johnny Mize

Prowling into the list at #87 is the original Big Cat Johnny Mize. Mize had one of the longest peaks in history as he led the league in home runs, slugging % and extra-base hits four times, RBIs, OPS, and total bases 3 times, OPS+ twice, and batting average, runs, and doubles once. When he wasn’t leading the league, he was coming awfully close as he consistently finished near the top of every major statistical category for nearly a decade. He finished in the top-3 in slugging % and OPS+ a remarkable nine times. He finished in the top-3 in extra-base hits and offensive WAR eight times and home runs, total bases, and RBIs seven times. Indicative of his immense power, Mize is 14th all-time in slugging % and 17th all-time in OPS+. He finished in the top-10 of the MVP voting six times including back-to-back runner-up finishes in 1939 and 1940 in which he was unquestionably the best hitter in the American League. Mize joins Mark McGwire as the only two players to lead the league in home runs twice in the American League and the National League. He was also a part of five World Series titles with the Yankees where he had a robust .584 slugging % and a .909 OPS. It’s hard to believe that Mize put together such a stellar career despite missing three full seasons of his prime serving in WWII.

The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #88 Nap Lajoie

When Major League Baseball formed in 1903, there were three players who could stake a claim as the greatest player of all time. That list included Cy Young, Honus Wagner, and #88 on our list, Nap Lajoie. Close to 120 years later, Lajoie is still arguably the greatest second baseman in American League history. He led the league in batting average and doubles five times, becoming one of three players in history along with Honus Wagner and Stan Musial to do so. He led the league in slugging %, and total bases four times, RBIs, OPS and OPS+ three times,  OBP twice, and home runs and runs once each. In terms of all-time standing among second basemen, Lajoie is the all-time leader in RBIs, second in doubles and hits, third in batting average, and fourth in triples. After 12 decades of Major League Baseball baseball, Lajoie remains the only player in history with 3,000 career hits, 600 doubles, and fewer than 350 strikeouts.

The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #89 Adrian Beltre

Coming in at #89 on the list is third baseman Adrian Beltre. While somehow managing to play two decades in relative anonymity, Beltre’s credentials are no less worthy of a spot in the top 100. Beltre’s standing among third basemen as both an offensive and defensive contributor is second to none. Among third basemen who played at least half their career at the hot corner, he is the all-time leader in hits, RBIs, games played, and plate appearances. He’s second in doubles, third in home runs and WAR, and fourth in runs. His 1,151 career extra-base hits are the most all-time for a third baseman and the 14th most in Major League Baseball history regardless of position. He’s second all-time in dWAR among third basemen, and he has the 13th highest dWAR total in history regardless of position. He’s the only player in history in the top-15 in both extra-base hits and dWAR. Beltre is also the only player in history with 3,000 hits, 450 home runs, and 27 dWAR, and he’s the only third baseman in history with 3,100 hits, 600 doubles, and 400 home runs.