The 100 Greatest in 100 Days: #12 Albert Pujols

Operating at #12 on the list is “The Machine” Albert Pujols. Pujols earned his nickname by consistently producing huge stat lines, year after year, for close to 15 seasons. His 12 seasons of at least 170 hits and 30 home runs are two more than anyone else in history and his 12 consecutive seasons of at least 170 hits and 30 home runs are four more than any other player. Pujols’ place in history is easy to see when considering his status on the all-time leaderboards. He’s #3 on the all-time RBIs, #5 in home runs, extra-base hits, doubles, and total bases, and #15 in hits and runs. He joins Hank Aaron and Willie Mays as the only three players in history with at least 660 career home runs and 3,200 hits. He’s the only player in history with at least 660 career home runs and 660 doubles. Pujols joins Aaron and Babe Ruth as the only three players in history with 600 home runs and 2,100 RBIs. Pujols and Aaron as the only two players in history with 3,000 hits, 600 home runs, and 2,100 RBIs. Demonstrating just how feared Pujols was across MLB, he was intentionally walked 313 times in his career which is the second-most all-time. Only Barry Bonds received more MVP recognition than Pujols as he garnered a remarkable 10 top-5 MVP finishes on his way to three MVPs and four second-place finishes. His seven top-2 finishes are tied for the second-most in history (Trout and Musial). Not to be outdone in the playoffs, Pujols is on the shortlist of the greatest postseason hitters of all time. He led the Cardinals to two World Series titles and three appearances. He was named the 2004 NLCS MVP in one of the most dominant performances in a postseason series ever. He went 14 for 28 with four home runs and nine RBIs in St. Louis’s thrilling seven-game victory over Houston. His 1.030 career postseason OPS is #1 all-time (min. 170 plate appearances). His name is stamped all over the postseason leaderboard as he is in the top-10 in postseason hits, runs, home runs, RBIs, walks, slugging percentage, and on-base percentage.

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